Damage to Your Leased Vehicle? Make Sure You Get OEM Parts

So, you just got in a fender bender in your leased vehicle. What do you do now? Is it different than if it’s a vehicle you own?

First off, make sure you are in as safe a location as possible and call 911 and report it to the police. Do this even it’s a minor incident, no matter whose fault it is. Police reports will help you establish facts and resolve disputes. Insurance companies want police reports and it will make the process smoother if you have official descriptions of the accident.

Next, call your insurance company. Hopefully, you have appropriate insurance so you’re not out of luck even if the other driver was uninsured or underinsured. Your insurer can get involved in the process even if it wasn’t your fault.

Damage To Your Leased Vehicle | Get OEM Parts

Third, call the lease finance company, especially if the vehicle is totaled. It’s their vehicle, after all. They’ll want to know what’s up and expect a call from an insurance company. Most leasing agreements carry GAP insurance, meaning insurance pays the leasing company the difference between the “totaled” amount and market value. The money doesn’t go to you but ensures you won’t owe extra.

The last step is probably the most important. Take your vehicle to a repair facility that will return your vehicle in like-new condition. Make sure they use OEM parts, not cheap aftermarket replacements or junkyard parts. You will be charged for repairs that don’t meet OEM standards to restore your vehicle to acceptable condition.      

At Cline Collision Center, we will put your vehicle back into pre-collision shape. As a Gold Class certified shop, you can feel confident knowing that we only use OEM parts and hold ourselves to incredibly high standards. Our ASE certification lets you know we stay up with all of the latest developments, offering a full slate of state-of-the-art autobody services, from dent removal to high-end painting and auto detailing. Contact us online or call us at 707-591-9909 if your car is in an accident, leased or not. You’ll be happy you took all the right steps!

Aftermarket or OEM?

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts are built by the maker of your vehicle. They fit and work perfectly because they are the same parts that were specifically engineered for your car. Aftermarket parts are made to replace damaged parts, usually at a lesser cost. They might be good quality parts. They might not.

Here is what you might want to consider before choosing:

OEM Parts

Because OEM parts are made by the automakers who designed and built your vehicle, they are generally more expensive than aftermarket parts. On the other hand, they are guaranteed to exactly match the parts they replace. This doesn’t mean that OEM parts are always superior to aftermarket parts—it just means that they aren’t the same. OEM parts can sometimes make repairs take longer—it may take shops more time to get parts from original equipment manufacturers than aftermarket suppliers.

Aftermarket Parts

Aftermarket parts are regulated by federal and state administrators. Still, some aftermarket manufacturers are better than others. The difficulty is in knowing which ones. Insurance companies often push for shops to use non-OEM parts because they can cost as much as 50 % less. Many shops use aftermarket parts and you have to trust if they are doing so because it is a better value, or they want to increase their bottom line.

Which is better for you? How do you decide?

The choice is yours, of course. You can research aftermarket parts and make an educated evaluation of your situation. Also, a very restrictive budget may make aftermarket parts your only choice. On the contrary, if you want to maintain the value of your vehicle and you want to guarantee the fit and quality of the repair, OEM parts are your best choice.It is also important to go to a body shop you can trust for advice and repairs you can rely on.  Cline Collision Center provides professional auto detailingdent removal, and exact-match painting. If you want your car restored to its pre-collision condition, contact us online or call us today at 707-591-9909. 

The Right Parts Installed the Right Way

Like anything else, choosing an autobody shop that you trust can feel like a leap of faith. Will they have the training, tools, parts suppliers, and equipment to return your car to pre-collision condition?

When your car is in an accident, you need to have confidence that the repair is done correctly. Going to an Original Equipment Manufacturing (OEM) certified body shop ensures that well-trained technicians are using parts that meet OEM standards.

We Know The Importance Of Your Vehicle

Your car is a critical component of your daily existence. Transporting yourself and loved ones safely is the top priority. You also don’t want to spend much time hassling with getting your vehicle fixed. That’s why it’s so crucial for car repairs to be done right the first time. An OEM certified shop provides expensive training sessions for its technicians with dealers or manufacturers. These shops also only use OEM certified parts. This ensures that your repaired vehicle will have parts that are of the same quality as your original vehicle.

Certification isn’t cheap. Shops that invest in better training and parts believe that safety and quality are more important than short-term profits gained by cutting corners. These certifications also need to be constantly renewed. That means a shop can’t get complacent—it requires a commitment to stay up with the latest developments in the industry. The right parts installed the right way with the right tools! Why would you trust your vehicle with cut-rate shops that don’t care about your safety? When you want your car or truck restored to its original condition, bring it into the pros at Cline Collision Center. Dent removalhigh-end paintingauto detailing—we do it all! If you want 100% satisfaction guaranteed repair for your damaged vehicle, contact us online or call us at 707-591-9909 today.

Your Auto Body Advocate

The Cline Collision Center process for repairing your vehicle.

Getting into an accident or damaging your car is one of the most inconvenient and stressful situations. It’s likely you won’t know what to do when it comes to dealing with your car insurance company and the auto body repair process.

That is where Cline Collision Center comes in. Our mission is to be our customer’s advocate. We know your situation is stressful and we understand the lingo and terminology your insurance company might be asking you. This is why we established a process for auto body repairs that removes the stress and delivers an exceptional finished vehicle for our customers.

The Cline Collision Center Vehicle Repair Process:

  1. File Claim with Insurance Company: Before Cline Collision Center can get started, you must file a claim and provide a statement with your insurance company.
  2. Call Cline Collision Center: Once you have your claim number you can provide it to us and we’ll get started.
  3. Estimates, Approvals and Loaner Car: Our Manager, Joe, will be the one who takes your claim number and begins working with your insurance company on an estimate for repairs. This will be the time that we also coordinate a loaner car to have during the duration of the repair.
  4. Prep for Repairs: Upon estimate approval, your car will be disassembled and repairs will be scheduled. OEM parts will be ordered, paint colors determined and repairs can begin.
  5. Structure Repairs: Our highly trained team will begin repairing your vehicle and bring it back to new.
  6. Body Work: Exterior panels and finishing will be replaced.
  7. Paint Shop: After the body work is completed, your vehicle enters our paint shop. We utilize only the best brands (Spies Hecker, Dupont and Axalta among others).
  8. Assembly: Our team will put all of the repaired panels back on the vehicle. Inspections are made to ensure every component is perfect.
  9. Detail: Upon sign off of repair, we then detail the car to make sure it looks pristine.

Communication is Key

We communicate with our customers through every step of the auto body repair process. We know how inconvenient it is for you and we want to make sure you feel at ease and informed. With Cline Collision Center being a Santa Rosa Gold Class Repair Shop by i-Car, and committed to only using OEM parts, you can rest assured your car is in good hands.

Get the best parts-and the best service at Cline Collision Center.

Schedule an appointment.

7 Things Auto-Body Shops Won’t Tell You

If you get into an accident, there are several things that are useful to know before you head to the body shop.

#1. A Fender Bender Can be Expensive to Repair

If you’ve gotten into a literal fender bender and it’s deemed that you’re the one at fault, you may be surprised at the cost of replacing a fender – even after the $500 deductible. The average fender replacement can cost anywhere from $300 to $1,600 after the costs of installation and painting. On vehicles with carbon fiber fenders, that cost can be as much as $5,000 to replace.

#2. Approved Shops are Often Obliged to Work on Behalf of Insurance Companies

Auto insurers contract with auto body shops to repair vehicles for a pre-negotiated rate; sometimes this includes practices like require low hourly labor rates, or making the shop pick up the cost of the rental car. Insurers often give customers so many discounts that it makes it impossible for shops to make much of a profit, causing some companies to feel tempted to cut corners.

#3. Not all Replacement Parts are Equal

OEM (original equipment manufacturer) parts are designed to match your make and model of vehicle exactly. Insurers generally prefer shops use generic, lower quality, or salvaged parts because they’re less expensive. If you’re at fault for an accident, you may be bound by your insurance policy to use these lower quality parts, however, if someone else is at fault be sure to tell your auto body shop to use OEM parts.

#4. The Due Date May Be Exaggerated

Mechanics often take on more work than they can handle but may blame it on things like parts being delayed. Before you choose a shop to do your body work, it’s always a good idea to check their online reviews to make sure that they deliver what they say they will.

#5. A Rental Car Can be Expensive

Renting a car is convenient if you’re going to be without your vehicle for an extended period of time, however, the costs can add up quickly. Renting a car for three weeks could cost $1,000 or more. Even if you have rental car insurance, your daily reimbursement may be limited to the cost of a compact car. Make sure your rental car insurance is comparable to the size of car you’re having repaired.

#6. Choose a Shop That Specializes in Your Type of Vehicle

Many European cars have precision parts and use types of metal that require specialized equipment to repair it. You should always take your car to a shop that’s certified by the manufacturer to work on your specific vehicle. Going to a manufacturer certified shop ensures the shop will understand your vehicle and have the right tools and parts to properly repair it back to manufacturer’s specifications. These shops do generally charge higher rates, so insurers won’t necessarily recommend them – but they should still be willing to pick up the tab.

#7. The Insurer’s Warranty Doesn’t Necessarily Mean Much

Insurers will sometimes exaggerate warranties on parts, for example, saying that they’ll be good for the life of the vehicle. This can be a tactic to urge consumers to go to a shop within their network. In reality, the body shop’s guarantee is the one that you should trust. Most shops guarantee their work, and most manufacturers guarantee their parts – those are the warranties that truly matter.

What Does MOPAR Stand For?

At Cline Auto Collision, we’re a MOPAR auto body shop, but what does that actually mean?

What is MOPAR?

MOPAR was named by combining the words “motor” and “parts.” MOPAR is the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FAC) Global Service and Parts division that’s responsible for manufacturing and distributing authentic replacement parts, components and accessories for Fiat, Chrysler, Jeep, and Dodge vehicles. Despite being a department within the Fiat Chrysler organization, many car owners refer to all vehicles produced by them as MOPAR.

What is a MOPAR Shop?

As a MOPAR auto body shop, this means we only use OEM (original equipment manufacturer) parts for all FAC repairs. The label of MOPAR is the same as saying that we’re FAC certified and means FAC has acknowledged that we meet their strict standards for repairing all makes and models manufactured by them. We make sure not only to use OEM parts but also to follow factory approved procedures and recommended equipment for every FAC repair job.

Why Use MOPAR Parts?

It’s crucial to use MOPAR parts for your FAC vehicles because every part is engineered specifically for your car. While aftermarket or generic parts can cut costs significantly, they may be of poor quality, fit irregularly, or may even potentially alter the appearance or structural integrity of your vehicle. Using MOPAR parts will ensure you receive high-quality repairs that restore your vehicle to factory standards while keeping your vehicle safe and reliable. If you’re in need of repairs for your FAC vehicle, contact Cline Collision Center! We’re proud to be a MOPAR auto body shop offering superior repairs that will make your vehicle look and feel like new.

Do Insurance Companies Have to Use OEM Parts?

Insurance companies are a business, and like many businesses, they’re interested in maximizing profitability. This means that when insurers contract with auto body shops, there may be a tendency for them to urge auto shops to use generic parts in an effort to cut costs – particularly if you were the one at fault for the accident. In some instances, insurers may even offer auto repair shops kickbacks for using non-OEM parts. Don’t assume that your insurance coverage automatically covers OEM parts; most likely it doesn’t.

Can I still Use OEM Parts if They’re Not Covered?

If OEM parts are a deal-breaker for you, it’s recommended you find an insurer that covers them, however, even if yours does cover them, they may not be an automatic option on a standard policy. You’ll most likely need to request the coverage or even pay an additional fee. Then there’s the issue of older vehicles or discontinued models; there simply may no longer be OEM parts available. In this case, a body shop only has options to use aftermarket or used parts, regardless of the coverage you have.

If OEM parts aren’t covered by your insurance, you don’t necessarily have to go with aftermarket parts; you have the option of paying the difference between the cost of OEM and aftermarket. Your insurance will cover the price of aftermarket parts, and you can tell us that you want OEM parts for your repair instead. You’ll be fully responsible for covering the difference in cost, but you’ll have peace of mind knowing that the parts used in the repair are specific to your individual make and model. The cost difference can sometimes be significant, so be sure to budget accordingly for the work that you’re having done.

If you have any questions about the insurance process, requesting OEM parts, or about OEM parts in general, give us a call today! We’re always happy to address any questions you may have.

OEM Collision Repair Parts and Procedures Bill Becomes Law in Rhode Island

Rhode Island Senate Bill 2679 (SB 2679), that expands the state’s existing requirement that consumers be given the right to choose and insurers pay for OEM parts on claims for 30 months after a vehicle is manufactured to all claims for a period of 48 months, is now law in Rhode Island. The bill that was approved by the Rhode Island legislature in June along with its companion House Bill 8013 took effect without Governor Raimondo’s signature on July 4. This means that insurance companies in Rhode Island no longer require use of aftermarket auto body parts, and more importantly do not install these after market parts onto a vehicle without the owner’s consent. So long as their vehicle is less than 48 months beyond the vehicle’s manufacture date. There are some ups and downs to this law going into place for consumers. The upside is that you have more control of what parts go onto your new car. Some of you might be thinking “this is amazing who would want after market parts on their vehicle”? While OEM parts will restore your vehicle back to factory specifications (which, most people would prefer because their vehicle is still very new), some people like replacing parts with aftermarket ones when they either mechanically fail or get damaged by accident. Think of Jeeps. Many Jeep owners swap out the entire look of the vehicle, for after market parts. However, insurers are not to thrilled about this because it costs more to put OEM parts on vehicle’s most of the time. For example, The Property Casualty Insurers Association of America initially wanted this bill to be thrown out as it could create pressure to raise auto insurance premiums and raise auto repair costs.

“We’re disappointed that the governor decided to let this bill become law,” said Frank O’Brien, vice president of state government relations for PCI, in a statement to Insurance Journal. “It is yet another in a series of auto body-related bills that the Rhode Island legislature has passed and have gone into effect which do nothing but increase rates for Rhode Island consumers so that the auto body industry in Rhode Island can continue to make the kind of money that it makes.”

O’Brien had previously spoken out in a PCI press release against the bill when it passed the General Assembly, adding that, “Rhode Island drivers, as a result, could end up paying the highest auto insurance premiums in the U.S.”

As a consumer, what do you think about this new law? Should California consider implementing this too? Cline Collision Center is an OEM certified collision repair facility. Give us a call today to schedule your free estimate.

why use OEM parts for BMW repair?

BMW has been a popular car brand for decades, and many drivers enjoy the speed and handling of these luxurious vehicles.

Your BMW is a luxury car. It deserves to be treated like one. You probably already make sure to maintain and service the vehicle as why use OEM parts for BMW repair?necessary such as oil changes, tire rotations, transmission flushes, and keeping the liquids at optimal levels. If you take such good care of your car’s mechanics, it’s just as important to take care of the auto body!

OEM, or original equipment manufacturer, parts can be more expensive than cheap aftermarket products. For this reason, some shops use aftermarket or “alternative” parts to cut costs. However, they are passing inferior workmanship onto you. This could mean parts that corrode and wear out faster, look uneven with the rest of the car, or even damage the structural integrity of your vehicle. OEM parts are specially made for your model vehicle; they are designed to fit and match perfectly, so you never have to worry about seams not lining up. Aftermarket parts can give you an inferior ride or cause more repairs down the line. OEM BMW parts are the same quality and exact design as when the vehicle was built in the factory. By using OEM BMW parts, auto body professionals ensure that your car remains at top performance.

BMW Repair Using OEM Parts in Santa Rosa

OEM parts ensure restored structural integrity and completely repaired appearance to factory standard for your BMW. Where can you get BMW OEM repair in Santa Rosa? From Cline Collision Center, the premier auto body repair shop in Sonoma County. Our team of auto body professionals are thoroughly trained in correct repair procedures and using our high-tech equipment. We only use OEM parts, and we even offer free detailing with repairs! Bring your BMW in today for quality auto body repairs.

Is OEM the same as original?

Cline Collision Center prides itself on being an OEM auto body shop. You can see our list of OEM certifications here, for car makers like Honda, Hyundia, Infiniti, Nissan, Ford, Dodge, Chrysler, and Kia. You may have heard the term OEM over and over again and wonder what it means and the burning question: is OEM the same as original? 

What does OEM mean?

OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer, and indicates that the manufacturer was the original producer of the part – fenders, quarter panels, headlight cover, grills, etc – when the car was built. In car lingo, original parts are used to refer to the parts that the car is assembled with in the factory. Every piece of the car as it exits the factory is an original part. Anything that is replaced, including a tail light, is no longer an original part. However, OEM parts are the same as the original in the sense that they are made by the same manufacturer, with the same materials, to the same specifications. OEM parts are markedly different than aftermarket parts. Aftermarket parts have questionable quality; while they may be cheaper, they also may be inferior and more likely to show uneven wear, not align with the seams of the car, and break down over time. By using OEM parts car owners know that they not only receive a vehicle that is completely returned to factory standard in appearance, they also know their car is restored in structural integrity as well.

After a collision, your car may need repairs to the body. While the replacement parts will not be original to the vehicle, they will be OEM parts that seamlessly fit in with your vehicle and ensure its resale value, structural integrity, and restored appearance. Cline Collision Center always uses OEM parts and proper repair procedures and equipment, which is why we are recognized by so many auto makers as a factory approved facility. Need auto body repairs to your vehicle after an accident? Call us today!